ANE Research Humanities

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Authors' bios

Vanessa Bigot Juloux holds an advanced degree in Ugaritic (École des Langues et des Civilisations de l’Orient Ancien). She is a PhD candidate at the École Pratique des Hautes Études (ephe) and Paris Sciences et Lettres (psl), and a research associate at the Institute of Archaeology (Andrews University, Michigan). Her research focuses on Ugaritic narrative texts and violent behavior for political purposes. She is involved in several committees at the American Schools of Oriental Research (asor). Since 2016, she has been co-organizing and co-chairing sessions on violence and digital humanities at asor and Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (caa) annual meetings, and she is also co-organizing and co-chairing an asor/ephe European symposium (2018). She has recently developed open-access guidelines for analyzing actions in tei-xml. She is currently co-editing a volume on violence in ancient cultures.
For futher information, see vanessabigot-juloux.xyz.

Doğu Kaan Eraslan has a BA in Philosophy from Galatasaray University (Turkey) and an MA in Egyptology from the Centre de Recherches Égyptologiques de la Sorbonne (cres). He is a PhD candidate at the École Pratique des Hautes Études (ephe) in Paris, where he combines his study of ancient civilizations with computer science, while being employed by ephe’s Cognition Humaine et Artificielle (CHArt) laboratory. His research interests include cross-language information retrieval for ancient languages, the application of data-science methodologies to ancient history, the encoding of ancient languages for machine-learning and computer-vision purposes, and Late Period Mediterranean history and international relations.
For futher information, see Academia.edu

Amy Rebecca Gansell holds a BA in Anthropology/Archaeology from Barnard College of Columbia University and an MA and PhD in Art History from Harvard University. She is an Associate Professor of Art History in the Art and Design Department at St. John's University in New York. Her research has been supported by grants from the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities (neh) and The American Academic Research Institute in Iraq (taarii). Her collaborative data-mining projects on Levantine ivory sculptures have been published in the Journal of Archaeological Science and the proceedings of the Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (caa) annual meeting. Her most recent work, presenting a 3d model of a Neo-Assyrian queen, appears in the American Journal of Archaeology.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Heidi Jauhiainen received her PhD in Egyptology in 2009 from the University of Helsinki. Since then, she has earned a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science and has worked on a project identifying and gathering pages on the internet written in Finno-Ugric languages. At the moment, she is part of the team of the Academy of Finland project working on finding semantic domains in Akkadian texts.

Krister Lindén is Research Director of Language Technology at the University of Helsinki and National Coordinator of fin-clarin. He has published more than 90 scientific papers on developing resources for Language Technology and tools for Corpus Linguistics.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Alessandro di Ludovico has a PhD in Archaeology and Art History of the Ancient Near East from La Sapienza University of Rome. He is currently a research fellow on projects concerning the historical geography of pre-classical Western Asia. His research interests mainly focus on figurative languages, material production, and the cultural history of third-millennium bce Syria and Mesopotamia, all fields that he has investigated for many years using both quantitative and qualitative methods. He has participated in several international meetings on Near Eastern Archaeology, Assyriology, and Digital Humanities, and he has worked as an archaeologist on field projects in Syria and Palestine.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Matthew Martino received his BA in Physics and Mathematics from the University of Chicago in 2003. He graduated with his PhD in Physics and Astronomy from the University of Pennsylvania in 2009 with a dissertation on cosmology, specifically largescale structure formation and modified gravity. He currently teaches at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Shannon Martino received her BA in Anthropology from the University of Chicago in 2003 and her PhD in Art History from the University of Pennsylvania in 2012. She was a postdoctoral fellow at the Field Museum in Chicago during the 2012–2013 academic year and has participated in excavations in Bulgaria, Turkey, and Syria. She currently teaches at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago, Illinois, and at Morton College in Cicero, Illinois. Her work focuses on Chalcolithic connections between Southeast Europe and Anatolia, particularly in terms of their pottery and anthropomorphic figurines.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Sveta Matskevich is a postdoctoral fellow at the Zinman Institute of Archaeology at the University of Haifa and an associated research fellow in the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem where she earned her PhD. Trained as a field archaeologist, she has participated in excavation projects in Israel, Greece, and Turkey, mainly as a surveyor, draughtsperson, and Database Management System architect and administrator. Her research interests include archaeological data management, field methods, and the history of archaeology. She is currently starting her own excavation of the site of Tel Mevorakh (Israel) as part of a regional project investigating the natural environment and transportation networks in southern Phoenicia during the Middle-to-Late Bronze Age.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

M. Willis Monroe works on cuneiform documents from the Achaemenid and Hellenistic periods in Mesopotamia. His principle interest is in the structure and format of types of knowledge and the way in which ancient scribes transmitted their expertise between texts. His work has focused primarily on Babylonian astrology and multi-modal documents. He holds a PhD from Brown University and is currently based in Vancouver, Canada, as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of British Columbia.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Terhi Nurmikko-Fuller holds a PhD from the University of Southampton. She is currently a lecturer in Digital Humanities at the Australian National University. Her research focuses on examining the potential of harnessing Semantic Web technologies to support and diversify scholarship in the humanities. To date, she has published on the use of Linked Open Data with musicological and library metadata; on the ontological representation of the narrative structure, philological, bibliographical, and museological data of ancient Mesopotamian literary compositions; and on the roles gamification and informal online environments can play in facilitating the learning process. Terhi was selected as a Fellow of the Software Sustainability Institute in 2016 and has visiting scholar status at the University of Oxford e-Research Centre.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Emilie Pagé-Perron is a PhD candidate in Assyriology at the University of Toronto. She researches third-millennium bce Mesopotamian social history, exploring administrative sources using traditional and computational approaches. She holds a Master’s degree in Mesopotamian Studies from the University of Geneva, where she wrote a thesis, supervised by Antoine Cavigneaux, on the division of labor in the fish industry of Early Dynastic Girsu. Previously a Jackman Junior Fellow and a Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (sshrc) doctoral awardee, she is co-principal investigator at the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (cdli), where she manages the international Machine Translation and Automated Analysis of Cuneiform Languages (mtaac) project and the cdli Framework Update.
For further information, see epageperron.info.

Miller C. Prosser is a research database specialist for the ochre Data Service of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago. He has a PhD in Northwest Semitic Philology from the University of Chicago, where his doctoral research focused on the economic texts from the Late Bronze Age site of Ras Šamra-Ugarit. Miller has worked on various research projects at the Oriental Institute. He is currently the data and photography lab manager for the Persepolis Fortification Archive Project. He has also joined various archaeological excavations as a field and object photographer. As co-director of the Ras Shamra Tablet Inventory (span class="small">RSTI</span>), he is interested in pursuing database solutions to archaeological and philology data problems.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Marco Ramazzotti has been, since 2007, a researcher and adjunct professor of Ancient Near Eastern Art and Archaeology in the Department of Classics at La Sapienza University of Rome. He combines historical-artistic and cognitive analysis of the ancient Near Eastern cultural milieu and researches the relationships among Analytical Archaeology, Artificial Intelligence, and Natural Computing. Since 1989, he has participated in many archaeological excavations, surveys, and restoration field projects in Palestine, Turkey, Libya, Yemen, Jordan, Iraq, and, especially, Syria. In Syria, he has been the field director of excavations and coordinated different interdisciplinary scientific teams for the planning and opening of the Ebla Archaeological Park.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Aleksi Sahala received his MA in the discipline of Language Technology (2014) from the University of Helsinki, where he is currently a doctoral student writing his thesis under the supervision of Krister Lindén and Saana Svärd.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Ilann Sharon is the Nachman Avigad Professor in the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. For almost his entire career, he has worked at the site of Tel Dor, starting as a beginning graduate student in 1980 and assuming co-directorship of the project in 2002. His other abiding interest is Mathematics in Archaeology. As such, he has taught and done research on statistics in archaeology, gis, 3d modeling, computerized stratigraphic modeling, and analytic typology, and he is one of the founders of a computational archaeology laboratory at the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
For further information, see Academia.edu.

Saana Svärd has a PhD from the University of Helsinki, where she is now a docent of Assyriology and Cultural History of the Near East. She is one of the leading experts in the study of women and gender in Mesopotamia, especially regarding the Neo-Assyrian Empire. Currently, she is the principal investigator of the project “Deep Learning and Semantic Domains in Akkadian Texts” (2017–2020). The project engages with cross-disciplinary endeavors to use language technology to gain a more nuanced understanding of semantics in Akkadian. This goal is also one of the focal points of the National Centre of Excellence in Ancient Near Eastern Empires (University of Helsinki, 2018–2025), which she directs.
For further information, see Academia.edu.